Tag Archives: Energy

India will draw coal four times more than now

Castle Gate Power Plant near Helper by David J...

Image via Wikipedia

Demand from the key six big sectors will grow fourfold to two billion tons by 2030. Home production of coal by that time will be about 1.5 billion tons. Demand at two billion.

Business as usual will have India import about 500 million tons of coal to meet requirements of just the six sectors. Even in low carbon coal need will be about 1.5 billion tons in 2030, thrice the current level of production.

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Freshwater consumption will more than triple by 2030

Freshwater consumption will more than triple in the next two decades and reach 18,000 million cubic meters in 2030. This is water that is lost and has serious social and environmental implications.

The power sector will account for the major share of freshwater consumption; its share will reduce from 90.5 to 85% in 2030. Water use will increase most dramatically in the iron and steel sector, in the cement sector and the aluminum sector. These sectors will see a six-fold increase in water use.

In low carbon freshwater use in 2030 is about 10% lower than in business as usual, this is largely because of reduction in power generation from coal-based power plants that one hopes will happen.

Pic: osawaterworks.com

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Nepal’s Pinthali village goes off-grid, now suffers

The meticulously planned off-grid systems of power generation in a village suddenly can suffer a major undoing of the gains if grid electricity is brought to the place.

Isolated off-grid systems usually fail when the government does not have a clear roadmap on what they want to do in the village as far as electrification goes in the long term. Their very small scale of generation makes it difficult for off-grid producers to partner with electricity user groups. Continue reading

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Plenty of power, but none to use in Nepal

Nepal although small as a nation, has a potential for hydro power generation of as much as 83,000 megawatts. Of this, about one-half is commercially viable, making Nepal the second largest hydro power potential next only to Brazil. Continue reading

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